captioning

Do all videos need to be captioned?

This looks just like how I feel!—me

I was at the opening for Craft Ontario’s LookListen exhibition and the usual thing happened: I knew no one (which turned out to be actually untrue, but I forgot her name), so I was planning to just see all the work and leave.

Except that this time seeing all the work would take a lot of time, because half a dozen pieces were music videos. Now the funny thing was that they used speakers instead of headphones, so during the opening you in fact couldn’t hear any music at all.

Music videos without music—yet touched me anyway.

This sort of reminded me of the art course in my program where the professor did not buy into the idea of “accessible art” in terms of how our program—at least on paper—defined accessibility. In this specific case was the video “accessible” or not? If you define “accessibility” as getting access to the lyrics, then it was completely inaccessible—even to hearing people. But if you defined “accessibiity” as getting access to the elicited emotions, then you could argue that the video was in fact, in an odd way, actually accessible.

This sort of brings us back to the RGD webinar I attended today. One random thing that struck me was how the presenter suggested that we “banish all colour cues.” My reaction was “banish? Are you serious?” Colour cues don’t need to be banished; they just need to be supplemented by other cues that are not colour-based: It turned out that this was in fact exactly what the presenter meant.

In the words of one of our profs, we need the cues to be in “different modalities.” I think those music videos that were in the gallery did use two different modalities. Yet they were created as pure art. Maybe in this sense art can actually inform design.

Subtitle editors

We really have been introduced only to CapScribe and Amara, the latter of which I was deeply familiar. But is this really the limit of what’s available?

Aegisub

When I was looking for alternatives for our captioning assignment, by chance I found Aegisub after a long unsuccessful search for open-source MacOSX-compatible editors. It is MacOSX compatible. And it is open-source. But for a simple school project the interface looked far too complicated; it’s, however, probably going to be really useful if I learnt how to use it and a real project comes my way.

SubtitleEdit, Jubler, MPC-HC

A few days ago I was checking my site statistics and noticed an interesting backlink, which linked to this post which recommended a few subtitle editors that I didn’t know about:

Since I don’t have Windows, the only one I can check out is Jubler. I’ll do that some time.

InqScribe

The other day I landed on this post and a poster recommended InqScribe. It supports both Windows and MacOSX, but it’s a commercial piece of software.

So there seems to be really quite a lot of options other than just CapScribe and Amara. Maybe some time I’ll try them all and report back what I find.

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